Indian Crops - Informative & researched article on Indian Crops
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Home > Reference > Geography of India > Indian Vegetation > Indian Crops
Indian Crops
Indian crops are mainly of two types- food crops and cash crops. Availability of water for irrigation along with modern tools and techniques has increased the crop production in India to a great extent.
 
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 Indian Crops Indian crops are of two types; indian food crops and Indian cash crops. Food crops are those, which are used for consumption, while the cash crops are used for business or commercial purposes. Some of the food crops are rice, wheat, pulses, while cash crops are Jute, cotton, sugar cane and many others. Being an agrarian country, it is natural that multitudes of crops are available in India. Most of the villages of India are hub of crops that are exported to various foreign provinces. Ample supply of water for irrigation, multiplied by high tech machines and techniques have accelerated the growth of Indian crops to a large extent.

The country produces around 193 million tonnes of a number of food grains each year. Paddy, wheat, barley, maize, millets like Jowar (great millet), bajra (pearl millet) and ragi (finger millet) are the major Indian crops that are found in the country. There are some cash crops which are grown in India. The cash crops enrich the economic condition of India. Jute, sugarcane, cotton, cashew are few examples of Indian cash crops that are mostly found in regions like West Bengal, Orissa, Haryana, Assam, etc. Thus Indian crops not only nourish the life of the Indian populace with their nutritional values, but also bring loads of revenue from abroad.

The basic food crop of India is Rice and this crop is grown in abundance in the western coastal strip, the eastern coastal strip, covering all the primary deltas, Assam plains and surrounding low hills, foothills and Terai region- along the Himalayas, and Bihar, West Bengal, northern Andhra Pradesh, eastern Uttar Pradesh, eastern Madhya Pradesh and the entire state of Orissa. Jute cultivation is believed to have started in India as early as 800 B.C. for manufacturing cordage, cloth and paper. Rice forms one of the prominent cash crops of the eastern parts of India. Jute is called the `brown paper of wholesale trade` since it is used for the package of many commodities such as cotton, rice, wool, wheat, sugar, fertilizer, pulses and cement. Jute is also used for manufacturing rugs, carpets, tarpaulins, ropes, upholstery and strings.

Indian Crops Wheat forms one of the oldest crops introduced in India and it does well on the loamy soils of Northern plains covering Haryana, Punjab, Western Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Gujrat, Rajasthan, Maharashtra and Madhya Pradesh in India. This country forms the largest consumer and the producer of pulses. Indian Pulses include grams (chana), arhar or moong, lentil (masur), black gram (wad) and peas (matar). They are grown all over the country, excluding areas with plentiful rainfall. India is has the largest surface area under sugarcane and its production is also the highest in the world. The Indian state of Uttar Pradesh is a leading producer of sugarcane and the other states where it is grown are Punjab, Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Bihar, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

Crops grown in India form an essential factor for the survival and growth of the nation. The cash crops and food crops both play a major role in the lives of the Indians. Some of the cash crops of India include Sugarcane, Tea, Rubber, Silk, Coffee, Cotton, Tobacco, Jute and Mesta, etc. The food crops of the country are Rice, Maize, Wheat, Jowar, Pulses, Bajra, etc.

(Last Updated on : 22/01/2014)
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Indian Crops - Informative & researched article on Indian Crops
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